a plan for the future

IMG_0600Should I have the privilege of living to a ripe old age, I anticipate having to work until 70 before tapping into retirement benefits that may or may not exist by 2040. If I continue making my living by writing, that means another 24 years spent sitting at a desk, staring at a lighted box and type-type-typing the day away.

This is assuming my mind stays sharp, and someone is willing to pay me for whatever it is I’m writing about.

As jobs go, I’m pretty lucky. I love words and have always been a writer. But sometimes I have the fantasy of freedom. Of selling everything, getting a rolling home and moving from one beautiful state or national park to another with James and the dogs, picking up odd jobs that keep gas in the tank and food on the table.

Even in this fantasy, I know I’d find myself craving a home rooted in the ground. A place with a bathtub. Something with a view and room to grow food and flowers. But I wouldn’t want to be saddled with a 30-year mortgage, so I’d need to take a non-traditional approach to finding a permanent place. Which I think I’ve figured out.

A commune.

But not just any commune.

A special one.

Here’s the appeal of the commune concept. A group of like-minded people pool their resources to buy a big piece of land upon which they each have their own small home. They share chores–like keeping the garden, tending to the chickens, feeding the livestock. If there are children (which there won’t be in this scenario because we’ll all be old), the adults share parenting responsibilities.

This all sounds idyllic and lovely to me except for one thing–all those people. Can’t you just hear the screen doors creaking and slamming all day as people come and go in each others’ homes? The chortles of laughter in the garden since it’s weed-pullin’ day and everyone participates? The good-natured ribbing about how Jeremy doesn’t know how to make good coffee from people standing around on his porch holding their mugs with both hands as little puffs of coffee steam rise in their faces?

It’s not that I don’t like people. I do. I just don’t want to be around them all the time. Which brings me to the way this commune will be different.

It’s a commune…for introverts. A non-communal commune.

Same deal as described above. Garden. Screen doors. Coffee. Porch. The difference is, no one really hangs out at each others’ houses or shows up unexpectedly. There’s one communal area where you can go when you want to be social or need to discuss who’s not pulling enough weeds, but other areas are treated like a typical urban neighborhood. A friendly, non-committal wave in the morning, maybe a comment about the weather, then go back inside.

Anyone interested? There will also be wifi.

 

12 Replies to “a plan for the future”

  1. I am totally in. Today I am wearing the t-shirt my wife bought me that reads: “You read my shirt, that’s enough social interaction for one day.”

  2. I am so in, you won’t even know I’m in.

  3. Oh my goodness, you hit me where I (want to) live. When I was younger (a very long time ago) I used to fantasize about living on a deserted island. When I was in school, my idea of an ideal school room was one where each kids sat inside a box with a small hole at the front to interact with the teacher (yep, I was pretty introverted back then). And today, I like people but in limited quantities and with specific attributes. I much prefer animals (my wife and I have 7 dogs and 3 cats).

    1. I’m sorry, but the visual of kids in boxes with a hole in the front made me laugh out loud. That’s great.

      Hope you survived floodpocalypse 2016. Rough stuff. We’ll pick a place for the commune that doesn’t include 500-year floods. That might require too much interaction.

    1. I totally forgot to include a still. Very important. And I like the idea of fencing so all the dogs can roam free. Good call.

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